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Rennlimousine meant “racing sedan” in 1930s. Within a month it’s going to mean *very emotional* for a car that was easily a decade ahead of its time. In fact, it’s the insemination of the Porsche 356.


German automaker Adler was consumed with a passion to make a car based on the work of German aerodynamicist Paul Jaray’s work. Jaray was a German aerodynamicist in early 30’s and he, in turn, was obsessed about Zeppelins.

Herr Jaray took the spindle design that had been perfected for the Zeppleins so wie das – and sliced it down the center. Then he flattened the tail section to enhance stability.  What emerged was the stuff of history.  Check out these pix.

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The intrepid Adler entered the Trumpf Rennlimousine in the 2-litre class at the 1937 24 Hours of Le Mans. Its 4-cylinders were woefully underpowered at 56 bhp, but low drag got it to 2nd in class, 9th overall. It was among the first enclosed automobiles to race in the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

A comparable automobile to the inaccessible BMW Kamm Coupe and the Mercedes-Benz 540 K Stromlinie, this is the genesis of every streamlined beauty that has followed its spirit down the Mulsanne Straight ever since.

RM Sotheby authorities are thrilled to offer the finest known Rennlimousine anywhere in the world on August 13. It’s endured a long path. At one time, this car was a daily driver to pick up rutabaga and cabbages.

I can relate.

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